About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 10
CSPAN2 6
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 2
CNNW 1
KQED (PBS) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
the deadly before the words. so please do have on the floor democratic leader and the yield to her the customary one minute. >> think you -- thank you, mr. speaker. i think the gentleman for yielding and rise in support of the resolution, very important resolution to condemn the act of a lone gunman in newtown, conn., and to offer condolences to the families and members of the community. i join him in the words of this resolution in saluting the coverage of the teachers and administrators who gave their lives to save the children and their care. the first responders your ride on the scene to and the succession of killings that were happening. those first responders, they leave their homes every day knowing they're going to face danger, and they did that day as well. in the face of it, they were heroic, as were the teachers and counselors and principle of this school. this has all been made very clear to us by our colleagues. of course congress meant murphy, senator elect murphy, who represents the district with such distinction in compassion. congressman courtney,, congressman jim
agree with her completely, mr. speaker. it's very important that we not let the sequester take place and i hope and believe that she is right, that we will not see that happen. and number two, i'd like to associate myself with her remarks as it relates to ensuring that we do not go over the fiscal cliff. that's something that is very, very desired on our part as well. i'd also like to respond to just one point very quickly, mr. speaker, before i yield to my good friend from roseville, and say that i can provide my friend from rochester, our distinguished ranking member of the rules committee, assurance that we will not be adjourning the congress today and ending our work. i have said, i said in the rules committee, mr. speaker, that we are going to continue with our work. the action that we're going to take as it relates to these two measures, again, the reconciliation package, which is designed to ensure that, as my friend from rochester has said, that we don't see sequestration which we all know would be devastating, take effect, it is a package of $238 billion over a 10-year perio
: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. smith: madam speaker, i yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. cole, who is the sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. cole: i thank you, madam speaker, and i thank the gentleman for yielding. and i would like to ask, madam speaker, at the appropriate time if i could submit a written statement on this particular piece of legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cole: i had a long oration i was going to make but i want to be quite honest. my good friend, chairman smith, and my good friend, chairman lofgren, have covered the case well or better than i can. they're both drished -- distinguished attorneys. they understand the intricacies involved here. so there's no need for me to go through and repeat the points that they've made. i do want to make one central point or two points. first i want to thank both of them. this is a matter of justice. this is a bipartisan effort, to try and make sure th
of legislation to come back to the house that she has on her agenda. mr. sessions: the gentleman is correct and we expect those. mr. woodall: this is the kind of house, deliberative house, i came to be part of two short years ago. we have the ability to get these things done in the next few days. i reject the idea that i read over and over again that this house has been delaying action this house got it right wetch got it right in a budget in april of 2011, we got it right in our budget in 2012, we got it right when we passed aest sequester replacement and we're getting it right with this rule today. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentlelady from california, our leader, ms. pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you very much, madam chair. ranking member. thank you, mr. speaker. why did i sort of smell smoke when i heard this debate? it's reminiscent of nero fiddling while rome burned. the american people are w
for her opening. >> thank you, mr. chair and thank you for your leadership on this issue in holding this important hearing. while this committee held a hearing on the drc not too long ago, recent event in eastern congo motivated closer examination of this current crisis. i want to especially thank assistant secretary ambassador carson and other witnesses are offering testimony to today's hearing. i would like to commend many of you sitting in the audience for your tireless work towards peace and justice for those affected by the past and current crisis. the concerns have been heard and the committee will elevate the status of drc supersedes the international attention needed to bring about lasting peace and stability. myself, members of the committee and colleagues in the senate are deeply concerned with omicron reports of human rights violations, recruitment of child soldiers and the involvement of drc's been eastern region. which is just scraping for the international community to work on common interest towards the resolution of a crisis that goes well beyond and 23 spirit we mus
and politically savvy. >> madison loved every minute of it. mrs. byrne -- mrs. monroe hated it. >> she warned her husband. you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it with a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i myself never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is, it is a lot of power. >> part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and make it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i'm constantly reminded about all of the people who lived there before and particularly, all of the women. >> fi
from her as an adult. >> that's probably the first time we've heard from her in a while. >> besides mrs. reagan. but -- >> who couldn't do it. >> but everybody else is in it. >> good for her! i can't wait to see that. >> well, congratulations on your production. congratulations on your future production. >> i had nothing to do with that one. >> i like that prom photo. >> so what's the due date? >> yeah, right. i'm just kidding. >> is that a national security -- >> i'm not going to say the due date but i'm due in the spring. is that close enough? >> hold on a second. did i ask what the due date was? what's the due season? >> the spring. that would have been a nicer way to say it. the due date's coming soon. >> that's reminiscent of some numbers in your family? i heard that tone. >> catch a white house christmas, first families remember, tomorrow on nbc at 8:00 eastern time. meredith, thank you. coming up next, business before the bell with brian sullivan. we're back in a moment. ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passio
here. mr. adelson, how much mon are you going to spend on the election? >> i did not touch her. she ran back into me. she just grabbed our camera. >> i know you were against the war in iraq, that is ok -- but you thought the war in afghanistan was -- was ok -- you thought that was worth doing. we did not check with the russians to see how they did there for 10 years. [laughter] but we did it. it was -- you know -- it was something -- to be thought about. >> when david koch sat down last night as a member of the u.s. delegation, i went over to ask a question. >> do you think unchecked concentration of wealth will undermine democracy? >> i could not quite hear you. i am deaf in one ear. >> we are not doing any interviews. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. [laughter] [applause] and to heal the planet. [laughter] my promise is to help you and your family. >> one of the first acts of civil disobedience at the democratic national convention took place on tuesday just outside the time warner cable center. >> we are here to ask president obama, who we need a p
that will be truly the super bowl. and the republican party today is incapable of competing at that level, mr. gingrich says. >> yeah, and i think that's right. and i think they'd like to chip away at her popularity, as they can. it's going to be tough because, you know, she's going to -- it looks reich she's probably going to take some time off and do some philanthropic things that are going to be hard to kind of smear over the next year or two. but i think that's right. i think that's what's driving this. but they should be careful because, you know, if they pull clinton too much into a partisan contest, she'll remember just how much she enjoys it. and that will give her the taste of it. and then she will jump in. and then there will be that soup other bowl, like gingrich said, is going to be very tough for them to win. >> and, molly, i think that the smear stuff, whether we consider it a few or the many, look at what happened with susan rice. look at what happened with eric holder, the attorney general of the united states. i mean, these guys build up a steam roll over there in various par
the house budget. passed not once but twice. provided real solutions. mr. speaker, here's our spending represented a different way, because there's so many head herrings in this body. i -- red herrings in this body. i want to say, mr. speaker, if you help me spread the word with my colleagues on the left. i'm on the rules committee. we often handle the rules debate here on the floor. it gets toxic from time to time. folks are trying to make their point. everybody's got their talking points. it turns out into an -- turns into an argument instead of a discussion how o to make america better. i do hope in this coming time, whether we use special order to do it, time off the floor to do it, we'll find an opportunity to have more of a discussion. because the facts are what the facts are. we ought to be able to agree on what the facts are, and then we ought to be able to disagree what about the solutions are. we ought to be able to question each other's judgment without questioning each other's motivations. i hope we'll be able to spend some time on that. i heard folks say, mr. speaker, oh,
mentioned, barack obama the story, but to be traveled to kenya with mr. marinus. we did a lot of taping over there, so you can see all of that in the special we did on her website, booktv.org. use the search function in the upper left hand corner watch some of the footage. it was quite a trip to kenya to see that background. yes, sir. >> guest: one of the great person is reporting reporting was he deconstruct it obama's memoir, faith of our fathers. dreams from our fathers. i think i got john mccain -- i had the fathers part right. which he wrote and 95 or so. 95 or 96. marinus went back to less accurate in the book, so it's a great companion to read if you read obama's memoir. >> host: there's some publishers, sentinel cognitive umt, that put out a budget anti, david limbaugh the great destroyer, i am the change and do nice to see obama's america are quite critical of president obama. trained to commit to these sell well? >> guest: they do because they serve right your wrong light as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy and another results have a very active audience in a president obam
there is a tendency to form that blood clot. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed, fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general, it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes, again, you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder, a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is, for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause, the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are condition
of need. that's what we've always done, and that's what we must do now. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you mr. president. i want to first begin by thanking my colleague from maryland senator mikulski, for her very kind and generous words about the recent tragedy that we suffered in connecticut and her sense of compassion and kindness in the remarks that she just made but also thank her for her vision and courage and leadership on the legislation before us and associate myself with the very eloquent and powerful remarks made by both senators from new york and the senator from new jersey today and i want to strongly oppose the amendments that would constrict and delay aid that is vital to connecticut as it is to the other states of the region that was hammered and pummelled by storm sandy in the night that it hit our area. the scope and scale of destruction made it one of the largest natural disasters to affect our nation. it left millions of people without homes or electricity. it cost tens of billion
. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes again you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are conditions when it is unlimited. so to some
adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe mated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you couldn't move without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you are a little breathless and it was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> he is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. >> they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now, you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am
senior during the period, before he graduated and left, only one person can remember her at all. the others constantly never saw. so \mr.{-|}\mister, what was that? she left. >> how long was she in seattle? >> guest: about a year and a half it as a single mother with, yes, and she had babysitters and she went to school part-time. got herself back together. that first semester at university of wide was the difficult because she got pregnant. so she had to sort of reveal herself on academically, and she did at the university of hawaii. and after barack, sr. had left hawaii to go to harvard, she and little barrie came back. >> host: 1962-19 safety seven they were back in honolulu. who was her second husband? >> guest: her second husband was another international guy. he was in indonesia. she met him at the university of hawaii. he was from the east-west center. brought americans the honolulu to prepare to go to asia for study. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did the move to jakarta? >> guest: he went back firs
not want to be identified. i said mrs. obama said she knows that the slave owners runs through her veins and she said that we were of the wrong side of history. it seems like a long time ago but it is not. >> host: in fact, you were able to work with to distant cousins. one is black and one is white fade did not know they were related but as a result of your research, they assisted. tell us about your relationship to each other and the book. >> guest: to have a contemporary narrative i thought what the book is about was the sweep of american history through one family with modern-day people grappling these two women i was trying to find the white ancestors and we thought it was someone in the slave owner family. i search for as many descendants as i could and the son of dolphus. i went back and forth to see these women of the family. they were older who really wanted to know. even though they knew what they found out would not be easy. >> host: have they rejected the story or is a universal embrace? the shields a family being the lineage represented by the former slave owner. >> guest: t
to talk her out of it. >> and it's irrelevant relevant who came up with the idea first because the idea was out there. ultimately, it's up to the president. if she calls him up and says mr. president, this is too difficult for me. it's too hard. i can't do this. i would like to withdraw my name, he can very easily say, you know this is your -- i am the president, i am going to stand by you 100% and, boom. >> that's the president telling you that. she could maybe still have the fortitude to say no but most people presented with that are going to say, mr. president, om okay. i am in. you are right. that did not happen. >> how did this -- what do we know because again, at the briefing yesterday boehner had had the news kong friends in the morning where he once again said, we are ready to deal but the white house is not ready to deal. they won't come up with any specifics, which i think is just bs. that's what he said yesterday morning. he announces. jay carney says there it is. nothing happening on that front. suddenly boehner shows up at the whitehouse. h
, dropped from public view until her death in july. >> you haven't answered the question, mr. president. >> from space to time, mike wallace spent 60 years mostly on "60 minutes" and most often afflicting the comfortable with his confrontational style of journalism. wallace died in april. another television star, dick clark, was the maker of teen idols on "american bandstand" and rang in the new year for america for nearly four decades. as familiar as the whistle that opens his tv show, andy griffith planned to be a preacher or opera singer but settled on acting which he did up until his death in july. when larry hagman was shot as j.r. ewing on "dallas," it was the most watched point in his career that gan -- began on "i dream of jeannie." and joe paterno was sullied by the child sex abuse scandal at penn state that broke just before his death in january. etta james died in january 50 years after her version of "at last" became a must at millions of weddings. whitney houston died in february. ♪ i will always love you ♪ >> donna summer, in may. and some unique sounds fell silent, to
involved in the manufacturing of water heaters. i thank the chairman again. i thank mr. aderholt and i also want to commend the gentleman and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california continues to reserve. the gentlelady from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: mr. speaker, at this time i would like to recognize for a period of three minutes dr. roe of tennessee who's a member of the education committee, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for three minutes. mr. roe: i thank the gentleman, the chairman, for yielding, and, mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6582. this legislation would establish a uniform energy efficient descripter for all water heaters, walk-in freezers and walk-in coolers. the legislation also improves the testing methods that determine whether or not these products are energy efficient which will provide certainty for manufacturers and their products. in my hometown is o
conservatives and liberal democrats have gone along with all of it. may i say, mr. speaker, what a pity he not to see the honorable member be secure in her place. from the jungle, she may not have it succeeded in talking to the nation on many things. but she did think for the nation when she called the prime minister of the chancellor [inaudible] [cheers] mr. speaker. no wonder this prime minister keeps on losing his temper. because his worst nightmare is coming through. economic credibility as part of an constant and unfair. yes, he is the chancellor. can someone get him out of here? [cheers] mr. speaker. fiscal rule is broken on every target that they set themselves. failing and failing. 212 billion pounds more borrowing than they promised two years ago. [inaudible] unfair, incompetent, and completely out of touch. before he heard my statement and before he let at the forecast. we don't jiggle the numbers in the treasury anywhere. that's when he was in the treasury. the budget responsibility and that is the problem he's got. his whole honesty was about complaining it is going to. that's
and worked as a photojournalist. she is here with her husband and she follows her father to the chautauqua stage. he spoke here when he was minority leader of the u.s. house of representatives. lynda johnson robb is the first child of lyndon johnson and lady bird johnson. [laughter] mrs. robb has served for 44 years and is now chairman emeritus. she was appointed by president jimmy carter to serve as chair of the president's advisory committee for women. she put her own career, including as a contributing editor @ "ladies' home journal" on hold to work with her husband on his successful virginia and the minute choral candidacy. as virginia's first lady, she launched and chaired the grid kenya district -- the virginia history project. she is here with her husband who has always been here before and her daughter and grandchildren. previously, a columnist and associate editor for "the new york sun" and chief speechwriter for read giuliani -- for rudy giuliani, he was responsible for writing the eulogies for the firefighters and fresh responders who died on 9/11. evelyn is also editor of the a
and trashy. donald trump sued her on behalf of his miss universe organization and miss usa is part of that, claiming she had defamed the organization. a judge in arbitration just agreed with mr. trump and awarded the miss universe organization $5 million in damages. was that the right decision? let's ask our panel. joining me now, arthur aidala, former prosecutor, now defense attorney. jonna spilbor, same pedigree. well come. i have to say, when he first filed it, i thought, that is just trump. he doesn't like what she said, she is entitled to her opinion. this arbitration judge did not see it that way. this is a big win for "the donald", arthur. >> it is a big win. hopefully donald trump doesn't need five million bucks. megyn: maybe he will donate it to charity if he can get it. >> be honest i don't think the woman has $5 million. let everyone understand, this is arbitration. this is not a trial. a judge sits in a room, a lot of times a former judge sits in a room and hears both side. however he didn't hear both side. the contestant decided she, her and her lawyer decided they weren't goi
it makes no sense. >> reporter: sense something garcia's wife of 59 years thinks her husband could use. do you think he's crazy? >> loco? >> reporter: call him crazy, but there is an entire federal office, the bureau of public debt, that collects money from hundreds of mr. garcias. this office in parkersburg, west virginia, was set up by president kennedy, so citizens could pay down the national debt. this year alone, it's collected $7.7 million in gifts, about $90 million since it was established. but $90 million isn't that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says, you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since -- >> 1992. >> reporter: that's when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the death. the depression era kid and army veteran says he's giving back to a country that's given him so much. a sense that's infectious. his daughter is now collecting cabs at work. his g
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)